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Uganda

PPP Projects in Infrastructure

Read more about the methodology and the data source
Project Name Sector Financial Closure Year Investment ($US Million)
MTN Uganda ICT 1998 $1,117.20
Bujagali Hydro Project Electricity 2007 $860.00
Kenya-Uganda Railways Railways 2006 $404.00
Namanve Power Plant Electricity 2008 $88.00
Umeme Limited Electricity 2005 $84.00
Kinyara Cogeneration Plant Electricity 2009 $59.00
Kakira cogeneration plant Electricity 2006 $43.00
Bugoye Hydro Electric Power Project Electricity 2008 $35.00
SAEMS Nyamwamba SHPP Electricity 2012 $34.00
Tororo Power Station Electricity 2009 $32.00
Project Name Sector Financial Closure Year Investment ($US Million)
Butama Hydroelectric plant Electricity 2017 $19.30
Tororo Solar PV plant Electricity 2016 $19.54
Lubilia Kawembe Hydropower Project Electricity 2016 $15.70
Nyagak III Hydro Power Electricity 2016 $14.50
Soroti Solar Power Plant Electricity 2016 $14.30
Rwimi Hydroelectric Power Plant Electricity 2015 $30.00
Siti Small Hydro Power Plant Electricity 2015 $15.40
SAEMS Nyamwamba SHPP Electricity 2012 $34.00
Kinyara Cogeneration Plant Electricity 2009 $59.00
Tororo Power Station Electricity 2009 $32.00
Project Name Sector Financial Closure Year Investment ($US Million)
MTN Uganda ICT 1998 $1,117.20
Bujagali Hydro Project Electricity 2007 $860.00
Namanve Power Plant Electricity 2008 $88.00
Umeme Limited Electricity 2005 $84.00
Kinyara Cogeneration Plant Electricity 2009 $59.00
Kakira cogeneration plant Electricity 2006 $43.00
Bugoye Hydro Electric Power Project Electricity 2008 $35.00
SAEMS Nyamwamba SHPP Electricity 2012 $34.00
Tororo Power Station Electricity 2009 $32.00
Rwimi Hydroelectric Power Plant Electricity 2015 $30.00
Project Name Sector Financial Closure Year Investment ($US Million)
Butama Hydroelectric plant Electricity 2017 $19.30
Tororo Solar PV plant Electricity 2016 $19.54
Lubilia Kawembe Hydropower Project Electricity 2016 $15.70
Nyagak III Hydro Power Electricity 2016 $14.50
Soroti Solar Power Plant Electricity 2016 $14.30
Rwimi Hydroelectric Power Plant Electricity 2015 $30.00
Siti Small Hydro Power Plant Electricity 2015 $15.40
SAEMS Nyamwamba SHPP Electricity 2012 $34.00
Kinyara Cogeneration Plant Electricity 2009 $59.00
Tororo Power Station Electricity 2009 $32.00

Infrastructure Indicators

Read more at World Bank Data

GCI Infrastructure Score

The Global Competitiveness Index (GCI)  is published in the Global Competitiveness Report and assesses the competitiveness landscape of 140 economies. The GCI Infrastructure Score is a component of the overall index and covers transport, electricity and telephony infrastructure. 

Read more at WEF

2.37/7

GCI Score as of 2015-2016
GCI Infrastructure Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Resources

    • 1999
    • Government of Uganda

    The Electricity Act, Uganda

    Chapter 145

    This is an Act to provide for the establishment of the Electricity Regulatory Authority; to provide for its functions, powers and administration; to provide for the generation, transmission, distribution, sale and use of electricity; to provide for the licensing and control of activities in the electricity sector; to provide for plant and equipment and for matters relating to safety; to liberalize and introduce competition in the electricity sector; to repeal the Electricity Act, Cap 135 and the Uganda Electricity Board (Special provisions) Act, Cap. 136; to provide for a successor Company to the Uganda Electricity Board, and for connected purposes.

    • 2013
    • Maximilian Hirn
    • World Bank Group (WBG), World Bank Group (WBG)

    Private Sector Participation in the Ugandan Water Sector

    A review of 10 years of private management in small town water systems

    This working paper reviews the first decade (2001-11) of Uganda’s pioneering private sector participation (PSP) model for small town water supply. The number of towns under the PSP model has steadily risen from only 15 in 2001-02 to over 90 in 2010-11 with a combined population of over 1.5 million. In evaluating the impact of this development, this working paper aims to guide further reform within Uganda, and to inform other countries considering similar PSP approaches.

    • 2006
    • Thelma Triche, Sixto Requena, and Mukami Kariuki

    Engaging Local Private Operators in Water Supply and Sanitation Services

    Initial lessons from emerging experience in Cambodia, Colombia, Paraguay, The Philippines, and Uganda

    This paper examines the experience of developing local private sector participation (PSP) in small and medium-size towns in Cambodia, Colombia, Paraguay, The Philippines, and Uganda. The paper, which reviews schemes supported by the World Bank, summarizes information on the contracts and the selection process, extracts lessons learned to date from the cases, and recommends follow-up activities to address some key issues and fill gaps that were identified in the course of the study. An overarching lesson from this study is that innovation and adaptation are essential to the successful introduction of local PSP. Designing interventions that include a process of innovation, adaptation, and refinement is the first step in ensuring that...

    • 2010
    • International Finance Corporation (IFC)

    Uganda: Small Scale Infrastructure Provider (SSIP) Program

    Brief on IFC's PPP advisory support to help the Ugandan government to achieve greater efficiency and improve access to water through PPPs through the Uganda Small Scale Infrastructure Provider (SSIP) Water Program. The first five-year management contract was awarded for the town of Busembatia.

    Lessons Learned from Implementation of a Successful PPP Program: #1 Leveraging Commercial Investments

    GET FiT Uganda is a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) program managed by KfW in cooperation with the Ugandan Government. The program leverages commercial investment in small-, and medium sized Renewable Energy (RE) projects in Uganda. This first Lessons Learned briefing note relates to leveraging investment and working in partnership to achieve financial close on a portfolio of renewable IPPs.

    Lessons Learned from Implementation of a Successful PPP Program: #2 The Building Blocks of a Successful PPP Program

    GET FiT Uganda is a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) program managed by KfW in cooperation with the Ugandan Government. The program leverages commercial investment in small-, and medium sized Renewable Energy (RE) projects in Uganda. Public-Private Partnership (PPP) programs resulting in successful enabling frameworks for private investments in Renewable Energy (RE) are few and far between. In order to prove successful, the framework must be built from the bottom-up. This Lessons Learned briefing note outlines how GET FiT Uganda put in place the appropriate “building blocks” of a successful program and how the GET FiT approach can inform future efforts in other countries.

    Lessons Learned from Implementation of a Successful PPP Program: #3 Program Implementation

    GET FiT Uganda is a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) program managed by KfW in cooperation with the Ugandan Government. The program leverages commercial investment in small-, and medium sized Renewable Energy (RE) projects in Uganda. GET FiT Uganda has created an enabling framework for renewable energy Independent Power Producers (IPPs), leveraging USD 450 million of investment and 158 MW of renewable power generation. These results were achieved through a combination of smart design and effective implementation arrangements. The day-to-day implementation has been instrumental to the program achieving highly ambitious targets, resulting in a positive, transformational change for the Ugandan electricity sector.

Date last reviewed: November 21, 2016

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